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The gravity of revolution: The legacy of anticolonial discourse in postcolonial Haitian writing, 1804-1934

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Reyes,Michael Castro (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2014
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1506548153/fulltextPDF/17F027AC29E74263PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
New York: Cornell University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Blacks, Literature, Haiti, Historiography, Black nationalism, Revolution (Haiti : 1791-1804), Francophone
Notes:
367 p., Examines the lasting consequences of the anticolonial, antislavery discourses of the Haitian Revolution on the way in which postcolonial Haitians understood the narrative structure of their national history from Independence (1804) to the end of the American Occupation of Haiti (1934). In this study Haitian intuitions of historical time are apprehended through an analysis of nineteenth and early twentieth century Haitian literary and historical works. These texts are scrutinized with respect to (a) formal narrative features such as truncation, ellipsis, elision, prolepsis and analepsis which reveal an implicit understanding of the disposition of the metahistorical categories of "past," "present," and "future" and (b) the analysis of the explicit reflections on history provided by narrators or authors. This dissertation argues, primarily, that the event of the "Haitian Revolution" (1791-1804) was fundamental to Haitian understandings of the emplotment of the whole of Haitian history.