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Sea of bones: The Middle Passage in contemporary poetry of the black Atlantic

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Elliott,Danielle Georgette (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2009
URL:
http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/304982455/fulltextPDF/BAC4AD963EC144B9PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
New Jersey: Princeton University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Blacks, Literature, Slavery, Poetry, Slave trade, African diaspora, Dabydeen, David, Middle Passage, Dawes, Kwame Senu Neville, Clifton, Lucille, Alexander, Elizabeth, African American
Notes:
225 p., Drawing attention to poets whose writing on this subject has received little critical attention, this study examines contemporary poetry of the black Atlantic in particular focusing on work by Kwame Dawes, David Dabydeen, Lucille Clifton, and Elizabeth Alexander. In exploring poetic treatment of the Middle Passage, primarily through the lyric, epic, and long poem, the author identifies four interrelated poetics that reveal the dynamism of this legacy: lamentation, retribution, rupture, and re-membering. While critical analysis of texts that rewrite slave experiences has tended to focus on narrative, and that primarily on plantation slavery, "Sea of Bones" advocates attention to the way black Atlantic poetry renders the Middle Passage as a complicated and haunting personal heritage.