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The Food Factor: Perceptions of the brand

Collection:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center (ACDC)
Contributor:
Brubaker, McKayla (main author), Settle, Quisto (author), Downey, Laura (author), Hardman, Alisha (author), Oklahoma State University Mississippi State University
Format:
Journal article
Publication Date:
2019
URL:
https://newprairiepress.org/jac/vol101/iss3/2/
Published:
United States: New Prairie Press
Location:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center, Funk Library, University of Illinois
Subject Term:
extension, extension communication, extension programs, mass media, Mississippi, USA, perceptions, research communication, social marketing, survey methods, surveys, race, ethnic factors, brands, branding, logos, The Food Factor, brand recognition, subtitles
Notes:
19 pages., Via online journal., Mississippi residents were surveyed to determine their perceptions surrounding the The Food Factor brand. The Food Factor is a weekly Extension mass media program that communicates research-based information about food, nutrition, diet, and healthy lifestyles. A researcher-developed survey instrument was used to collect information using Qualtrics. The sample consisted of a representative sample of 404 Mississippi residents over the age of 18. Nonprobability quota sampling was used to examine population segments related to sex, Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic populations, and other racial demographic segments. The respondents were asked about their use and awareness of The Food Factor, where they were split into viewer and non-viewer categories. Viewers were asked about their viewing frequency, perceptions and skills learned related to watching The Food Factor, and their nutrition-related behaviors. Non-viewers were also asked about their perceptions of The Food Factor between branded and non-branded The Food Factor episodes. This study found the The Food Factor brand lacked brand recognition and recall. However, the respondents had a slightly positive perception of the brand. Overall, this study could not conclude that branding of the episodes was making a difference in non-viewers’ perceptions, despite the fact that many previous studies have identified branding as an important strategy in social marketing. Recommendations include a consistent and increased use of the brand, such as subtitles or logos, and future research on the use of branding in social marketing program, social marketing in Extension, and the role of branding in mass media programs.