« Previous | of | Next »

Differences in perceptions of foods between young men and women

Collection:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center (ACDC)
Contributor:
Betts, Nancy M. (main author), Glenn, Marty (author), Timmons, Patricia (author), Department of Nutrition Science and Dietetics, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Format:
Conference paper
Publication Date:
1994
Published:
USA
Location:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center, Funk Library, University of Illinois Box: 97
Subject Term:
attitudes, behavior, food, Nebraska, USA, nutrition education, perceptions, women
Notes:
James F. Evans Collection, Ham, Mimeographed, 1994. 1 p. Presented at the Society for Nutrition Education, Portland, OR, July 16-20, 1994., As part of a larger project, we mailed 500 surveys to a random sample of 18 to 24 year olds. The purpose was to measure the influence of factors impacting food consumption. The survey included demographic items, a repertory grid of foods and factors influencing their intake, and a modified Block food frequency. The response rate was 39% (n=195) with 73 males and 122 females returning completed questionnaires. Results of a principle components factor analysis using varimax rotation identified three factors for both groups. For the males, Factor I identified advertising of foods eaten out as important. Factor 2 indicated a strong perception of the healthfulness of the food as a negative perception, with "fattening" foods considered not healthful. Factor 3 showed the expense of food as a negative perception. For the females, Factor 1 identified convenience and appearance as perceptions. Factor 2 was similar to the males'. Factor 3 indicated that social aspects of food and eating were important perception. This information can serve as a basis for creating effective nutrition education messages for young adults.