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To Fanon, with love: Women writers of the African diaspora interrupting violence, masculinity, and nation-formation

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Tomlinson,Yolande M. S. (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2010
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/814731432/fulltextPDF/B41E4CDE5A984EADPQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Georgia: Emory University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Blacks, Authors, Literature, Haiti, Women, Zimbabwe, Africa, African diaspora, Danticat, Edwidge, 1969-, Fanon, Frantz, 1925-1961, Jones, Gayl, 1949-, Dangarembga, Tsitsi, 1959-
Notes:
239 p., Undertakes a critical task of "writing to" and "writing back to" Frantz Fanon on the issues of violence, masculinity, and nation-formation. The author deploys Brian Keith Axel's formulations of "national interruption" to position African diasporic women's novels--specifically Gayl Jones's Corregidora, Tsitsi Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions, and Edwidge Danticat's Breath, Eyes, Memory --as critical interruptions to Fanon's formulations.