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A prescription for health: (pseudo) scientific advertising of fruits and vegetables in the early 20th Century

Collection:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center (ACDC)
Contributor:
Nelson, Michelle R. (main author), Das, Susmita (author), Ahn, Regina Jihea (author)
Format:
Journal article
Publication Date:
2020
URL:
https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/42114
Published:
International
Location:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center, Funk Library, University of Illinois
Subject Term:
advertising, commodity promotion, food, fruit, history, information issues, nutrition, scientific communication, social factors, social marketing, vegetables, produce, produce promotions, food issues, medical information, food advertising, pseudo science
Notes:
Due to the Library's response to COVID-19, this document is currently only available through online access. If no link is provided in this record, the ACDC will make this document accessible through our collection once we are able to return to our office., Journal article via online. 58 pages., Historical analysis of print advertising in the early 20th Century revealed that "in an era of scientific discovery and therapeutic ethos, fruits and vegetables were advertised as medical tonics, with 'prescriptions' that included recommended daily doses, to ward off or cure real or imagined medical ailments (flu, listlessness, acidosis)." Findings identified social positives and negatives associated with this practice. Researchers recommended use of a broader social marketing and transdisciplinary approach.