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Garifuna kids: blackness, modernity, and tradition in Honduras

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Anderson,Mark David (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2000
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/pqdtft/docview/304619425/fulltextPDF/8662757DB8424861PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Austin, TX: University of Texas at Austin
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Race relations, Black Carib Indians, Honduras, Race identity, Central America, Garifuna
Notes:
422 p., A study of the politics of race, culture and identity among Garinagu in Honduras. Garinagu are a people of African and Amerindian descent deported by the British from St. Vincent to Central America in 1797. Within Honduras, they have been racially interpellated as “black” in contradistinction to the dominant mestizo, understood as the product of the racial-cultural fusion between the European and the Indian. Anthropological studies have failed to substantially investigate the relationship between Garinagu and the mestizo-dominated society and state. They have also neglected the construction of racial-cultural identity among Garinagu themselves.