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African Caribbean Immigrant Acculturation, Ethnic Identity, and Psychological Outcomes

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Wright,Roshane S. (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2013
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1435634674/fulltextPDF/19422FDEA705443EPQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
District of Columbia: Howard University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Blacks, Psychology, Emigrants and immigration, Acculturation, Caribbean people, Social psychology, Adjustment
Notes:
104 p., According to the 2010 census Caribbean immigrants make up 49% of the Black immigrant population of the United States, yet there remains a limited amount of acculturation research with Caribbean immigrants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between acculturation, ethnic identity, and psychological outcomes in a sample of immigrants of African-Caribbean descent. Using Berry's (1997) theoretical framework for acculturation research, the author hypothesized that ethnic identity mediates the relationship between acculturation and psychological outcomes. A sample of adult, self-identified immigrants of African-Caribbean descent recruited in the Houston metropolitan area completed a survey packet that included a bidimensional measure of acculturation, a measure of ethnic identity, and scales of self-esteem, life satisfaction, and depression.