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Canon and corpus: The making of American poetry

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Upton,Corbett Earl (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2010
URL:
http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/858093223/fulltextPDF/B61DFABD47F74743PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Oregon: University of Oregon
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Jamaica, Blacks, Literature, Poetry, McKay, Claude, 1890-1948, Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 1807-1882, Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892
Notes:
223 p., Argues that certain iconic poems have shaped the canon of American poetry. Not merely "canonical" in the usual sense, iconic poems enjoy a special cultural sanction and influence; they have become discourses themselves, generating our notions about American poetry. By "iconic" the author means extraordinarily famous works like Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "Paul Revere's Ride," Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself," and Claude McKay's "If We Must Die," that do not merely reside in the national memory but that have determined each poet's reception and thus have shaped the history of American poetry.