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A Dark Spectre: The Haitian Revolution and American Politics

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Silverman,Aaron Jay (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2010
URL:
http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/850898092/fulltextPDF/61E29B0D414B4430PQ/2?accountid=14553
Published:
California: University of California, Los Angeles
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, History, United States, Blacks, Haiti, African Americans, NATIONALISM, Politics, Revolution (Haiti : 1791-1804), Age of Revolution, Abolitionism
Notes:
637 p., Utilizes perceptions and attitudes towards the Haitian Revolution as a means to resituate party conflict and the boundaries of American nationalism in the Early Republic. The concept of nationalism is utilized in both the shaping of political culture and in the institutional formation of the state. As a result, the Haitian Revolution generated contradictory factional responses between the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans to the emergence of revolutionary abolitionism in the Atlantic. On a more popular level, the ordeal of Haiti engendered a fear of black militant abolitionism that hardened American attitudes towards the possibility of further slave emancipation in the United States.