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Skin bleaching in Jamaica: A colonial legacy

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Robinson,Petra Alaine (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2011
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/885230743/fulltextPDF/23A9681BDA8E4148PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Texas: Texas A&M University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Jamaica, Education, Popular culture, Postcolonialism, Skin bleaching, Media, Skin color
Notes:
319 p., Examines the psychological and socio-cultural factors that influence the practice of skin bleaching in the postcolonial society of Jamaica. Additionally, the study outlined the nation's efforts to combat the skin-bleaching phenomenon. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and to collect and analyze data. The sample consisted of fifteen participants--twelve participants (six males and six females) with a history of skin bleaching; a retailer of skin lightening products; a local dermatologist who has written and published in local newspapers on the practice; and a representative from the Ministry of Health who was integrally involved in the national educational efforts to ban the practice. The overall findings show that there is a bias in Jamaica for light skin over dark skin and these values are taught in non-formal and informal ways from very early in life.