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Re-configuring paternal legacies through ritualistic art: Daughters and fathers in contemporary fiction by women of African descent

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Pierre-Louis,Barbara Gina (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2012
URL:
http://www.worldcat.org/isbn/9781267518682, http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/1034564611/A0216E68C62D42F1PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Minnesota: University of Minnesota
ISBN:
9781267518682
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Blacks, Authors, Literature, Haiti, African Americans, Women, Brazil, African diaspora, Haitian Americans, Danticat, Edwidge, 1969-, South America, Memory, Jones, Gayl, Afro-Brazilian, Felinto, Marilene, Fathers and daughters, Rituals
Notes:
233 p., Analyzes three contemporary novels by Black women authors to argue that their daughter-protagonists gain a sense of their own subjectivities as women of African descent through their imaginative and creative responses to their respective muted paternal histories and legacies. These responses motivate the creation of ritualistic art forms rooted in communal practices such as storytelling, sculpting, music, dance-drama, folk medicine, and traditional cuisine. Maps the centrality of family, community, rituals, and art to the development of female subjectivity as represented in Marilene Felinto's As mulheres de Tijucopapo / The Women of Tijucopapo , Edwidge Danticat's The Dew Breaker , and Gayl Jones's Corregidora.