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Wah eye nuh see heart nuh leap: Queer marronage in the Jamaican dancehall

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Moore,Carla Kathleen Martina (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2014
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1511677517/fulltextPDF/2E69748135A74C8FPQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Canada: Queen's University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Jamaica, Blacks, Gender studies, GLBT Studies, Homophobia, African retention, Performativity, Queerness
Notes:
155 p., Explores the interweaving of colonial and post-colonial British and Jamaican Laws and the interpretive legalities of sexuality, compulsory heterosexuality, and queerness. The research project begins by exploring the ways in which the gendered colonial law produces black sexualities as excessive and in need of discipline while also noticing how Caribbean peoples negotiate and subvert these legalities. The work then turns to dancehall and its enmeshment with landscape (which reflects theatre-in-the round and African spiritual ceremonies), psycho scape (which retains African uses of marronage and pageantry as personhood), and musicscape (which deploys homophobia to demand heterosexuality), in order to tease out the complexities of Caribbean sexualities and queer practices.