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Negro: Travel and the pan-African imagination during the nineteenth century

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Flemming,Tracy K. (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2010
URL:
http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/276318138/fulltextPDF/6E6EFC3E53024728PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Michigan: University of Michigan
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, History, Blacks, Literature, Religion, 19th century, Africa, Black nationalism, Pan-Africanism, Black Power, travel, United States Virgin Islands, Blyden, Edward W.
Notes:
178 p., This dissertation is about the role that conservative religious notions of racial ideology played in the historical origins of black nationalism and pan-Africanism. Focuses on the writings of an African Caribbean, Edward Blyden, as the centerpiece of the study. Blyden, a native of Saint Thomas (Virgin Islands) and considered one of the "fathers" of both pan-Africanism and African nationalism, was a particularly complex diasporic intellectual. Traveling first to the United States in the pre-Civil War period, then to Africa and Britain at the height of the European imperial venture - and Christian missionary efforts - Blyden served as a conduit between the West (the United States and Britain) and both a traditional and a Muslim Africa. He saw his role as one of mediating (critiquing/translating) these divergent voices and ideologies with the object of constituting a "modern," pan-African subject.