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African Americans from "back yonder": The historical archaeology of the formation, maintenance, and dissolution of the American enclave in Samana, Dominican Republic

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Fellows,Kristen R. (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2013
URL:
http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/1411924559/fulltextPDF/BC0145F2C5164BB6PQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, History, Blacks, Dominican Republic, Anthropology, Haiti, African Americans, African diaspora, Archaeology, Emigration and immigration, Samana (Dominican Republic)
Notes:
480 p., By the end of 1825, 6,000 African Americans had left the United States to settle in the free black Republic of Haiti. After arriving on the island, 200 immigrants formed an enclave in what is now SamanĂ¡, Dominican Republic. The Americans in SamanĂ¡ continued to speak English, remained Protestant (in a country of devout Catholics), and retained American cultural practices for over 150 years. Relying on historical archaeological methods, this dissertation explores the processes of community formation, maintenance, and dissolution, while paying particular attention to intersections of race and nation.