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"In the same boat now": Peoples of the African diaspora and/as immigrants: The politics of race, migration, and nation in twentieth-century American literature

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Davis-McElligatt,Joanna Christine (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2010
URL:
http://search.proquest.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/docview/619321218/fulltextPDF/11C95A7DC159442BPQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
Iowa: The University of Iowa
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Caribbean area, Barbados, Blacks, Literature, African Americans, Faulkner, William, Emigrants and immigration, African diaspora, Marshall, Paule, Baldwin, James, Ware, Chris
Notes:
369 p., Reconstructs the process of migration, assimilation, and the realization of full sociopolitical participation in the United States in terms of the relationship between peoples of African descent--who were compelled to migrate as slaves across the Middle Passage, and who also voluntarily immigrated from various localities within the Black Atlantic--and select groups of immigrants from other locations around the globe. The author concentrates on novels by William Faulkner, Paule Marshall, James Baldwin, and cartoonist Chris Ware, and examine closely how these authors, in their respective texts, work to restructure, reimagine, and thereby challenge the enshrined American narratives of national belonging and acculturation through literary constructions of the identities and experiences of peoples of African descent, as migrants themselves, in tandem with their social, political, economic, sexual, racial, and cultural engagements with other immigrants to the nation-state.