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Misappropriated ethnicity: A Caribbean American's autoethnographic account of identity and authenticity

Collection:
Black Caribbean Literature (BCL)
Contributor:
Cole,Leonita A. (Author)
Format:
Dissertation/Thesis
Publication Date:
2014
URL:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1526021026/fulltextPDF/2DC0042AD27942BBPQ/1?accountid=14553
Published:
California: Fielding Graduate University
Location:
African American Research Center, Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Subject Term:
Blacks, Caribbean Americans, Racial identity, Authoethnography, Identity development, Cross, William, Jr
Notes:
159 p., Explores the lived experience of a Caribbean American Black woman in search of her racial and authentic ethnic identity. As a result of her research in womanist theology, she is forced to confront truths about herself and how she misappropriated her ethnicity. As a method of discovery, she employs autoethnography to examine her identity experiences using William E. Cross's Black identity development (hereafter referred to as BID) theoretical framework. With the use of meditation and memory sessions, she develops a flashback narrative to determine how her misappropriation occurred during the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. Her awareness is an evolutionary progression to challenge hidden, unexamined memories, uncover personal truths, and integrate alienated aspects of her life.