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Pollinator-friendly plants: Reasons for and barriers to purchase

Collection:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center (ACDC)
Contributor:
Campbell, Benjamin (main author), Khachatryan, Hayk (author), Rihn, Alicia (author)
Format:
Journal article
Publication Date:
2017-12
URL:
https://journals.ashs.org/horttech/view/journals/horttech/27/6/article-p831.xml
Published:
United States: American Society for Horticultural Science
Location:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center, Funk Library, University of Illinois
Subject Term:
advertising research, buyers, buying behavior, Connecticut, USA, consumer information, consumers, horticulture, incentives, labeling, pest management, pesticides, surveys, bees, birds, motivation, pollinators, demographics, floriculture, impacts, butterflies, high price
Notes:
9 pages., Via online journal., Certain pesticides are coming under scrutiny because of their impact on pollinator insects. Although most consumers express willingness to aid pollinators, the reasons for consumers’ preferences or barriers to purchasing pollinator-friendly plants and the types of pollinators’ that consumers are trying to protect are less understood. Using an online survey of 1200 Connecticut (CT) consumers, of which 841 had home landscapes, we find that 46% of consumers with home landscapes purchased pollinator-friendly plants to attract pollinators to their landscape. Consistent with past research that focused on consumers’ preferences for pollinator-friendly plants, the data also reveal that some consumers are willing to pay premiums for plants that contribute to pollinator’s health. However, only 17% stated that attracting pollinators was their primary motivation; a finding that suggests labeling alone will likely not motivate consumers to purchase plants. The major barriers to purchasing pollinator-friendly plants included lack of labeling (cited by 28%), followed by high price (28%). Consumers purchasing pollinator-friendly plants were trying to attract butterflies (Lepidoptera) (78%), bees (Apidae) (59%), hummingbirds (Trochilidae) (59%), and other birds (41%). We also find that demographics and purchasing behavior affect barriers and types of pollinators desired. Simply labeling plants has the potential to increase purchasing, but increasing price could be detrimental as many consumers feel pollinator-friendly plants are highly priced. Implications for ornamental horticulture stakeholders are discussed.