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Information needs and information-seeking behaviors of urban food producers: implications for urban extension programs

Collection:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center (ACDC)
Contributor:
Kumudu P. P. Kopiyawattage (main author), Laura A. Warner (author), T. Grady Roberts (author)
Format:
Online journal article
Publication Date:
2018
URL:
http://www.jae-online.org/index.php/volume-59-number-3-2018/2164-information-needs-and-information-seeking-behaviors-of-urban-food-producers-implications-for-urban-extension-programs
Published:
USA: The American Association for Agricultural Education
Location:
Agricultural Communications Documentation Center, Funk Library, University of Illinois
Subject Term:
agricultural education, communication analysis, extension, extension communication, information needs, sustainability, electronic media, agriculture information, information access, food production, information patterns, information seeking behavior, communication preferences, information delivery, social media, urban agriculture, survey research, urban farms
Notes:
Via Online Journal, Extension is challenged with meeting the needs of a variety of stakeholders. As the country becomes more urban, Extension may need to adapt programming to reach new clients. Having an understanding about what, when, and how urban food producers gather information is important to address their needs. Information that is relevant, up-to-date, and meets clients’ needs, enables their ability to adopt new ideas and innovative technologies, providing more opportunities for success. A mixed-method research design explored the information needs and information-seeking behavior of urban food producers in Columbus, Ohio. Urban food producers in this study most needed information to increase food production. Respondents preferred to receive information from the Internet and other electronic media over conventional information sources. This group of urban producers trusted information from university and Extension sources, but expressed mixed opinions about their personal experiences with OSU Extension.